i should be mopping the floor: Create a Simple Garbage Can Storage Area

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Create a Simple Garbage Can Storage Area

I'm happy to report that we finished our simple Garbage Can Storage area in our side yard! 
And I've included a tutorial if you'd like to make your own.

One part of our yard makeover is complete. It's a simple, but a very effective idea to keep our unsightly garbage can hidden from the street.

My city-issued eye-sore of a dumpster is now hidden. Amen and hallelujah. I so wish I could have some cute painted metal garbage cans on my curb, but we get to use these beauties above. They are more practical and functional with their fancy wheels and super truck that picks them up. But...meh.
And I'm proud to say, this mini deck we built for our can went together in one morning's time {this doesn't include the drying time for the stain and weather sealer}. It was very simple, straight-forward construction.

Check out the detailed tutorial below>>>


You can see in this post here how we prepped the area with Spectracide's Weed & Grass Killer and Weed & Grass Foaming Edger. These products made the process super simple. Spectracide’s performance-based benefit solutions that cost less than the leading competitor - giving you more bang for the buck. Spectracide helps us all make smart choices when it comes to lawn and garden care. Check out their Facebook page here for more great ideas {and coupons!} for your outdoor areas.


We were able to keep the cost of this project really low. My dad recently built a deck at their home and let me use some of the scraps to create this piece. And by "let me use", I mean, he hauled everything over to my house, and helped me assemble the entire piece. Have I mentioned how much I adore that man? 

We used three 2x4s, cut to the length we needed for the area we were creating this piece for {you'll have to decide what's best for your space on this one, size wise...and if your piece is a lot longer/larger than ours, you may want to consider more than three 2x4s to distribute the weight evenly}. 

For the main surface area, we used seven 1x6 treated decking boards, cut to our length that we needed {again, the amount of these you use will depend on how large yours is}. We also used 2x4s for the lattice framing and plastic lattice for the interior of the frame {I was a bit leery of the plastic lattice for fear it could cheapen the piece, but I really like how it turned out...you can't even tell and it is much sturdier than the wooden variety}. For the main base, everything is held together with coated deck screws. Be sure to buy both the coated screws and treated lumber so the elements won't affect either over time.

We laid our three 2x4s out and started with our first board. Each 1x6 was attached to all three 2x4s with three screws {so, nine screws total per 1x6}. I pre-drilled the holes on the end pieces to prevent them from splitting.

I have to say, a great system to put these together is to use both a driver and a drill simultaneously, so you're not having to switch bits all the time. Or, two drills would work, too. My dad brought over his driver for me to try out. Then he left it here and went and bought himself a new one {but, don't tell my mom, k?}. I think this is how I acquired about half of my power tools. Love him.


Once we added the second 1x6, we used a clamp to make sure everything lined up correctly and the boards were level once screwed down. We used the clamp on every subsequent 1x6.

Then just keep on attaching all of the 1x6 boards to the frame, one right next to the other. It went really fast and this thing was almost done before we knew it.


We measured how high the garbage can was and then the width of the base piece to determine the size of the lattice. We cut four 2x4 pieces and used longer deck screws to assemble the frame. Again, pre-drill your holes on the frame since the screws are in the ends of the wood pieces. 

And someone, please remind me not to wear that clown shirt when I'm in a photo again. And maybe to slap on some lip gloss. Honestly.


Lay your frame on top of your lattice to see how you'll need to cut it. We just marked the lattice with a permanent marker. We used a plastic-cutting blade and trimmed the excess with a jigsaw. We tried to use tin-snips, but they didn't work quite as well. The jigsaw gave us a much cleaner edge. We actually left it a bit longer on the bottom edge to allow it to cover the base as well. This was just a preference. 


We used galvanized lath screws to attach the lattice to the 2x4 frame. These prevented the screw head from sinking too far into the lattice.


I switched back to the longer deck screws to attach the frame with the lattice into the base. I did them every couple of inches. Originally, we planned to add a large L-Bracket to that corner you see above {and its partner}, for stability. But the piece was actually super stable without it. We've even had two major storms with crazy wind since this was assembled and it's held up beautifully. B-E-A-utifully.


I stained the piece with maple-colored stain cloths...they matched the lattice perfectly. Then I went over the entire piece with two coats of weather sealer {the type you seal a deck with}. We let it dry overnight and pulled it back outside.

If your cute lil' deck doesn't sit level, add some wood scraps under the base pieces until it does. We used a couple of wood pieces under the back corners to make ours level. It's a super mathematical leveling process: stand on it and wiggle around. Add wood pieces and repeat wiggling until it won't wiggle anymore. Super technical.


We made a notched area where our sprinkler system piping comes out of the house. This little pipe was a part of the reason we didn't do patio pavers as we originally planned {you can see our original plans for this area here}. But, honestly, I'm happy we didn't. I'm loving how this turned out. And, if we ever move, this baby can come with. 

I also planted some jasmine to grow up the lattice. I went back and forth on where to plant it. I settled on a simple planter on the inside. Our mowers, God love 'em, are kind as all get out, but not always careful with the edger. Not sure a vine would have lasted on the other side of the lattice. 


Here's a view from the front. I know right!?! It's like a dumpster disappearing act we've got going on here. Where could that trash can be? ;)




Thanks so much for following the fun with this project. Be sure to follow the Spectracide Facebook page for giveaways, savings and tips. 
This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Spectracide. The opinions and text are all mine.








6 comments:

  1. Love, love, love it!! I need to show my husband because ours just sits in a spot that gets muddy when it rains. And just say no to lipgloss during wood projects! I tried to be cute once while cutting wood and every.little.piece. stuck to my lips and I couldn't get them off. ;)

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  2. Love this! And you look absolutely beautiful in your photo no need for lip gloss! :)

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  3. Love this! And you look absolutely beautiful in your photo no need for lip gloss! :)

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  4. My neighbors have attempted to hide their garbage cans, but this one is just darn right pretty. You have inspired me to make one for myself. :-)

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  5. I WISH we only had one of those trash totes...we have 3! Garbage, recycling & greenwaste. We aren't allowed to store them in front, so we drag them back to the side yard behind the fence every Wednesday. Did I mention the HUGE hole at the curb that we have to muscle them through? Yeah. The entire pathway is dirt, and washes out whenever it rains, or the HOA decides to finally turn on the median sprinklers. So yeah. I need about 1/4 ton of fill dirt, pavers, sand, and one truck crew of hot guys to knock that project out for me. I'm over it and haven't even started yet! LOL

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  6. This is such a great post. I love your wit and sense of humor! My dogs have been looking at me with concern because I keep cracking up. :-D By the way, I'll be putting this stealth disappearing trick to use ASAP, but I may add a front that swings open or perhaps drops down, creating a ramp for our two similarly hideous town-issued garbage & recycling cans. Our house is positioned in such a way that one side may not do the trick. I'll need to think about it for a bit to make sure I can actually access the lids without a big ordeal in order to throw out the garbage...yeah, that would be bad.

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